Projects / Digital Fingerprints: Using Electronic Evidence to Advance Prosecutions at the International Criminal Court

Digital Fingerprints: Using Electronic Evidence to Advance Prosecutions at the International Criminal Court

Data & Democracy

Building tools to foster public engagement for the people of California and around the world.
  • Eric Stover
    Adjunct Professor of Law; Faculty Director, Human Rights Center,

Digital Fingerprints: Using Electronic Evidence to Advance Prosecutions at the International Criminal Court

The first Salzburg Workshop on Improving War Crimes Investigations, a convening focused on the use of digital evidence to prosecute atrocity crimes (genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes) was held in Salzburg, Austria, from October 23–25 2013. The Human Rights Center sponsored the workshop in collaboration with CITRIS, the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, and Salzburg Global Seminar at the Schloss Leopoldskron, an Austrian castle occupied by the Nazis during World War II and subsequently dedicated to promoting human rights and international justice. 

The workshop sought to promote an open exchange of ideas and expertise on strategies to improve the capacity of investigators and prosecutors to gather and analyze digital evidence relevant to serious international crimes.

Workshop participants included investigators and prosecutors from the International Criminal Court, specialists in cyberinvestigations, human rights investigators, foundation representatives, legal experts, and University of California, Berkeley, faculty and students.

Digital Fingerprints Salzburg Report 2014